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I’m normally not one to post selfies unless there is a reason behind it: like a new hair cut, weight loss, etc. 

Well today, there is no real reason other than the fact that I felt confident in myself. That’s a good enough reason, right?

I’m normally not one to post selfies unless there is a reason behind it: like a new hair cut, weight loss, etc.

Well today, there is no real reason other than the fact that I felt confident in myself. That’s a good enough reason, right?


Trafalgar Square
My second and last entry for the Association of Illustrators Prize for Illustration 2015.

Trafalgar Square

My second and last entry for the Association of Illustrators Prize for Illustration 2015.

(Source: ciaran-m, via kwaj)

thepeoplesrecord:

Today in history: 16th Street Baptist Church bombing of 1963September 15, 2014
The Sixteenth Street Baptist Church in Birmingham was used as a meeting-place for civil rights leaders such as Martin Luther King, Ralph David Abernathy and Fred Shutterworth. Tensions became high when the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC) and the Congress on Racial Equality (CORE) became involved in a campaign to register African American to vote in Birmingham.
On Sunday, 15th September, 1963, a white man was seen getting out of a white and turquoise Chevrolet car and placing a box under the steps of the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church. Soon afterwards, at 10.22 a.m., the bomb exploded killing Denise McNair (11), Addie Mae Collins (14), Carole Robertson (14) and Cynthia Wesley (14). The four girls had been attending Sunday school classes at the church. Twenty-three other people were also hurt by the blast.
Civil rights activists blamed George Wallace, the Governor of Alabama, for the killings. Only a week before the bombing he had told the New York Times that to stop integration Alabama needed a “few first-class funerals.”
A witness identified Robert Chambliss, a member of the Ku Klux Klan, as the man who placed the bomb under the steps of the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church. He was arrested and charged with murder and possessing a box of 122 sticks of dynamite without a permit. On 8th October, 1963, Chambliss was found not guilty of murder and received a hundred-dollar fine and a six-month jail sentence for having the dynamite.
The case was unsolved until Bill Baxley was elected attorney general of Alabama. He requested the original Federal Bureau of Investigation files on the case and discovered that the organization had accumulated a great deal of evidence against Chambliss that had not been used in the original trial.
In November, 1977 Chambliss was tried once again for the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church bombing. Now aged 73, Chambliss was found guilty and sentenced to life imprisonment. Chambliss died in an Alabama prison on 29th October, 1985.
On 17th May, 2000, the FBI announced that the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church bombing had been carried out by the Ku Klux Klan splinter group, the Cahaba Boys. It was claimed that four men, Robert Chambliss, Herman Cash, Thomas Blanton and Bobby Cherry had been responsible for the crime. Cash was dead but Blanton and Cherry were arrested and Blanton has since been tried and convicted.
Source

thepeoplesrecord:

Today in history: 16th Street Baptist Church bombing of 1963
September 15, 2014

The Sixteenth Street Baptist Church in Birmingham was used as a meeting-place for civil rights leaders such as Martin Luther King, Ralph David Abernathy and Fred Shutterworth. Tensions became high when the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC) and the Congress on Racial Equality (CORE) became involved in a campaign to register African American to vote in Birmingham.

On Sunday, 15th September, 1963, a white man was seen getting out of a white and turquoise Chevrolet car and placing a box under the steps of the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church. Soon afterwards, at 10.22 a.m., the bomb exploded killing Denise McNair (11), Addie Mae Collins (14), Carole Robertson (14) and Cynthia Wesley (14). The four girls had been attending Sunday school classes at the church. Twenty-three other people were also hurt by the blast.

Civil rights activists blamed George Wallace, the Governor of Alabama, for the killings. Only a week before the bombing he had told the New York Times that to stop integration Alabama needed a “few first-class funerals.”

A witness identified Robert Chambliss, a member of the Ku Klux Klan, as the man who placed the bomb under the steps of the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church. He was arrested and charged with murder and possessing a box of 122 sticks of dynamite without a permit. On 8th October, 1963, Chambliss was found not guilty of murder and received a hundred-dollar fine and a six-month jail sentence for having the dynamite.

The case was unsolved until Bill Baxley was elected attorney general of Alabama. He requested the original Federal Bureau of Investigation files on the case and discovered that the organization had accumulated a great deal of evidence against Chambliss that had not been used in the original trial.

In November, 1977 Chambliss was tried once again for the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church bombing. Now aged 73, Chambliss was found guilty and sentenced to life imprisonment. Chambliss died in an Alabama prison on 29th October, 1985.

On 17th May, 2000, the FBI announced that the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church bombing had been carried out by the Ku Klux Klan splinter group, the Cahaba Boys. It was claimed that four men, Robert Chambliss, Herman Cash, Thomas Blanton and Bobby Cherry had been responsible for the crime. Cash was dead but Blanton and Cherry were arrested and Blanton has since been tried and convicted.

Source

(via musicvengeance)

fleurdulys:

Vines in October - Theo van Rysselberghe
1912

fleurdulys:

Vines in October - Theo van Rysselberghe

1912

(via zsazsabellagio)

My heart is heavy as I think back to that tragic day 13 years ago. Has it really been that long? My thoughts and prayers go out to each and every person who was affected and to the families of the victims. Stay strong. 🇺🇸 #united

My heart is heavy as I think back to that tragic day 13 years ago. Has it really been that long? My thoughts and prayers go out to each and every person who was affected and to the families of the victims. Stay strong. 🇺🇸 #united

firstfamily:

President Obama, First Lady Michelle Obama, & Vice President Biden observe moment of silence at the White House on the 13th anniversary of 9/11.

firstfamily:

President Obama, First Lady Michelle Obama, & Vice President Biden observe moment of silence at the White House on the 13th anniversary of 9/11.

coc-o:

what a family

coc-o:

what a family

(Source: yulchka, via nykoleofflourence)

nonelikerae:

All I want. This would be a dream come true.

(Source: musicgivesasoultotheuniverse, via burnthecity)

Dascha Polanco attends the Rolando Santana Fashion Show at NYFW

Oh my gosh I LOVE her hair! She looks beautiful!

(Source: orangeis, via musicvengeance)

The best index to a person’s character is how he treats people who can’t do him any good, and how he treats people who can’t fight back.
—Abigail Van Buren (via hqlines)